Tuesday, December 13, 2005

Pure Oil - Part II (2005)

My three year-old daughter goes to a Chabad nursery school with a little girl named "Michal". Michal's mother is Jewish and her father is a devout Irish Catholic. Fortunately, Michal has a caring Jewish grandmother who sucessfully convinced the Irish Catholic father to send Michal to the Chabad nursery school by explaining that it was considerably cheaper than other nursery schools in the area.

Although Michal attends a Chabad nursery school, she returns home to a house full of Christmas decorations and is fed ham and cheese sandwiches by her parents. One day as Michal got ready to leave school, she turned to her teacher and said, "My daddy is going to pick me up now and take me to go sit on Santa's lap."

Michal's story, like the story of Binyomin, makes me want to scream. Although the parents may have the best intentions, they are raising their children in a manner that will ultimately obscure the essence of the child's being.

With Chanukah approaching, may Hashem have rachmonus on children like Michal and Binyomin and help them so they will not be lost in the great American melting pot.

7 Comments:

At December 13, 2005 at 7:25:00 AM EST, Blogger MC Aryeh said...

It does hurt the heart. A difficult, sad situation. They say a family only goes three generations before someone does teshuva and returns to the fold, but the generations have to be Jewish for that to happen...

 
At December 13, 2005 at 7:48:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Yes. It makes me think about the fact that in the golus of Mitzrayim only 1/5 of the Jewish people were redeemed.

 
At December 13, 2005 at 9:43:00 AM EST, Blogger Mirty said...

Even when parents of mixed marriages agree to raise their children Jewish, the children will still end up celebrating from xtian holidays with their xtian grandparents. However, in all cases I've seen, the power inherent in Judaism takes strong root and in the end, the kids choose Judaism. (I'm sure there are other cases, but that's just my experience.) I'm not advocating intermarriage, but given that it is a reality, don't write off those kids. (You don't, but others do.) I'm glad the Chabad school has welcomed Michal.

 
At December 13, 2005 at 10:53:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Mirty: Indeed. One of the best things about Chabad is that they embrace Jews like little Michal.

 
At December 14, 2005 at 5:36:00 PM EST, Blogger Alice said...

Why two people who practice totally different religions would marry is beyond me, but I take religion seriously and many people don't. The thing is these situations can be super complicated. What if one or both of them really started to take his/her religion seriously AFTER they got married. Should they divorce? This really happens and is a serious dilema. Would a divorce be more harmful to the child than 'practicing' two religions? (I know, I shudder at the thought.)

 
At December 14, 2005 at 7:08:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Alice: You raise some excellent points.

 
At December 14, 2005 at 8:44:00 PM EST, Blogger Alice said...

Of course the child could have parents who are divorced and still be caught between two faiths, which would be even worse.

 

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